Assassins Creed Eagle Pillow

[wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]Creed Pillow finished design made into pillow cover[/wpcol_1half][wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""] The style of quilting used on this pillow is called TRAPUNTO. Trapunto is a method of quilting in which only certain areas are raised. Technically they are stuffed. So on this pillow, the feathers, face, and triangle above the body are all sewn in as enclosed areas and then stuffed. I did trapunto for the first time at about the age of 16 and figured out an alternative method very quickly because I hated the method of traditional trapunto. I will give you a quick rundown comparing the traditional method with my method. [/wpcol_1half_end][wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]

 

So, in both methods you sew your enclosed shapes (I tend to call them worms so if I slip and say that, know that it means enclosed shape.) I personally like to sew right up to the stitching at the beginning and tie threads off at the back rather than backstitch each end. So my stitching would very simply look like this.[/wpcol_1half] [wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]trapunto basic[/wpcol_1half_end][wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]

 

At this point, in traditional trapunto, you slit the back of the fabric between the lines of stitching and fill with cotton or some kind of stuffing.[/wpcol_1half][wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]trapunto cut

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Then stitch it up. So the back of your piece has cut fabric and stitching down the middle of each worm. Besides being a difficult technique, it also leaves the fabric susceptible to fraying and looks very messy.[/wpcol_1half][wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]trapunto old[/wpcol_1half_end][wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]My technique is to NOT cut the slit in the back of each worm but to use acrylic yarn to fill each worm. Thread a blunt-tipped yarn needle with a length of yarn that will be doubled. With the blunt tip of the needle  dig down in between the threads at one end of the worm and slide the needle in between the layers of fabric until you get to the other end of the worm. Feed the needle back out of the fabric by pushing in between the threads again. Pull the yarn through until it has only a 1/4 tail at the end you started. Then cut the ending part of the yarn to 1/4 inch also. My worms on this pillow are about a half inch wide so I used 3 double threaded passes on each worm. Now pull on the bias of the fabric and the little ends of the yarn will pop inside and now the worm is stuffed. [/wpcol_1half] [wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]

 

 

trapunto needle in[/wpcol_1half_end][wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]

 

For worms that turn sharply you enter one end of the tunnel, come up at the turn, pull yarn through, and then go back in same hole and finish end of worm. Once you’ve done this the back of the fabric will look more like this.[/wpcol_1half] [wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]trapunto needle multiple[/wpcol_1half_end]

Now I’d like to talk about your choice of fabrics for the front side of the trapunto and the back side. The front can be anything you like AS LONG AS YOU WASH IT FIRST or otherwise clean as you would the finished product. I have dogs so everything in my house has to be either machine washable or leather. I picked 100% linen since I was aiming for a look that was medieval and linen was available during the middle ages. Also, the linen I chose didn’t shrink at all when it was washed. I chose a “Utility” fabric (Yes, it said Utility Fabric on the bolt at Joann’s Fabric and Craft store. I cut a small test piece, serged the edges and washed and dried it. It shrunk about a third it’s length and width – PERFECT. I like the combination of fabric that doesn’t shrink with the backer that does because once you’ve done the actual stuffing and wet it, the backer shrinks and pushes the front out.[wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]

 

 

Typical trapunto made with the front fabric and backer made with similar shrinkage fabrics will look like this when viewed on edge.[/wpcol_1half] [wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]trapunto quilt 1[/wpcol_1half_end][wpcol_1half id="" class="" style=""]

 

If you use a backer that initially shrinks a lot more than the front fabric you’ll get more relief on the front. The cross section view will look more like this.[/wpcol_1half] [wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]trapuntofabric

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But this does create a bit of pucker between sections of the worms and some backer will need to be cut away or at least slit so the pucker doesn’t detract from the overall look.[/wpcol_1half]

[wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]Creed Pillow backing

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On the front I did a bit of tea dying in an unusual way. I sprinkled loose tea on the design, brushing it into the corners and off the raised areas, and misted it with hot water. After I rinsed this out and let it dry I also dry-brushed (using a toothbrush) brown shoe polish (the old-style paste shoe polish) into the edges. I discovered a long time ago that shoe polish stains so I use it quite a bit for antiquing. So, design done, I added piping and an envelope closure back. Very easy project and I hope you have fun trying either this design or another one that lends itself to trapunto.[/wpcol_1half] [wpcol_1half_end id="" class="" style=""]Creed Pillow tea-dying with loose tea[/wpcol_1half_end]

 

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